How To Get Started on YouTube: From New YouTubers ⋆ [FinCon]

How To Get Started on YouTube: From New YouTubers

All of the social platforms continue to push video. On top of that, there’s a whole new audience of people that prefer video over reading.

But creating video and growing an audience with it can be tough and extremely overwhelming.

I’ve asked a handful of new finance YouTubers to talk about what it’s been like starting out. All of these folks have started producing video regularly less than a year ago.

Check their answers to get a fresh take on what it’s like to start video as a beginner. As you’ll see, some of them even have conflicting/different viewpoints.

So if you’re getting started with video, read their advice and pick and choose what makes the most sense for you.

Natalie – nataliebacon.com

Q1: How long have you been putting videos on YouTube? 

Three months! I started YouTube videos in June 2017.

Q2: What 3 tips would you give to someone just starting on YouTube?

1. Despite what people tell you, your equipment matters. Lighting and sound matter the most. I recommend getting a couple of box lights, a ring light, and a mic. 

2. Unless you’re a natural, it’s going to take time to be relaxed on camera. The more videos you do, the easier it gets. Practice!

3. Research everything. Take time to learn about lighting, sound, cameras, talking on camera, tone, talking with your hands, energy, video editing, etc. The effort you put in will pay off.  

Q3: What do you wish you would’ve known when you first started?

That it would be a lot harder than I thought. It’s one thing to have everything set up right. It’s another thing to sound natural on camera so the video is actually good.

Q4: What would you say to someone who’s nervous about being on camera?

Rip it off like a band-aid! Step outside your comfort zone and try something new. You’ll learn a lot and you’ll grow. Even if your videos are bad, it’ll be worth it. Over time, you will get better.

Video From Natalie

Alyssa – mixedupmoney.com 

Q1: How long have you been putting videos on YouTube? 

Just one year ago I decided I would regularly upload videos to YouTube in correlation with my blog. It has now been 11 months since I uploaded my first video!

Q2: What 3 tips would you give to someone just starting on YouTube?

1.Start filming yourself just to see how it feels and to find your strengths. The hardest part about getting started on YouTube is just that — the getting started! I find everyone’s normal response or thought when it comes to video related content is that they feel uncomfortable in front of the camera. 

2. Don’t worry about equipment until you’re all in! You don’t need an $800 camera and $400 ring light if you’re just starting out. Try to film on your phone before you invest in any products.

3. Have fun and be creative! People come to watch videos to see your true personality and also to learn about their interests in a unique way.

Q3: What do you wish you would’ve known when you first started?

I wish that I knew how much effort goes into filming just one 5 minute video. Not only do you have to brainstorm an idea, write an outline, and film. You also need to take the time to edit and promote your video once the camera is off.

Q4: What would you say to someone who’s nervous about being on camera?

I would tell someone who is nervous about being on camera that it’s completely normal to be your toughest critic. It’s hard to put yourself out there and allow others to criticize — but the fact that you’re willing to help others grow, and educate them with your ideas and thoughts is what truly matters.

The more you do it, the less awkward you’ll feel. I promise.

Video from Alyssa

Tess wanderwealthy.com

Q1: How long have you been putting videos on YouTube? 

I first started in October 2016 to supplement my podcast episodes. I started seriously focusing on video, and thus my YouTube channel, in June of 2017.

Q2: What 3 tips would you give to someone just starting on YouTube?

1. You’ll hate your first videos, but just hit record, upload, and then publish. Getting started is the hardest part.

2. Done is better than perfect when it comes to editing. If you want to learn something – check YouTube! But don’t aim to add all the bells and whistles the first time you edit. Focus on improving each video by 1%, and after 100 videos you’ll be an expert YouTuber.

3. When coming up with topics, think about what people want. Just like blogging… create content that people are looking for, not what you think they need.

Q3: What do you wish you would’ve known when you first started?

I wish I knew I would enjoy it as much as I do! …so that I would have started earlier.

But as for more tactical advice, I would have given myself? Vulnerability sells. It gets clicks and views. The more vulnerable/relatable you can be, the more people enjoy watching and following along with you.

Stop worrying about the potential criticism you might receive, especially in the PF industry of saying something that could be “inaccurate” or that someone might “disagree” with. Being honest about your mistakes, or exposing your vulnerable points makes for much more engaging content–which is the goal of all content, in my opinion.

Q4: What would you say to someone who’s nervous about being on camera?

It’s difficult to get comfortable being on camera or even just on a microphone, but it’s best to relax and treat it like a normal conversation. Don’t think about being on camera.

Think about looking through the camera, and talking to the person on the other side. There’s nothing worse than sensing someone else’s discomfort.

Create an outline, but feel free to take it off script. And stop thinking about how ridiculous you must look/sound!

Video from Tess

Steve and Courtney astreaminlife.com & thinksaveretire.com

Q1: How long have you been putting videos on YouTube? 

Our first video was uploaded on April 12th of 2016. But, we kicked the videos up a notch in frequency since my wife and I left Tucson and set sail as full-time travelers in our Airstream in 2017.

Q2: What 3 tips would you give to someone just starting on YouTube?

1. Start with what you have. Don’t invest a ton of money on equipment at this point. Even cell phones record perfectly acceptable video, especially for a platform like YouTube.

2. Get comfortable talking to a camera. At first, it might seem weird…but especially if you’re doing vlog-type videos, talking to a camera is critical to producing content that people actually want to watch. Do it. Keep doing it. The more you practice, the easier it’ll get.

3. Your content doesn’t have to be perfect, believe me. There are plenty of YouTube channels out there that produce very mediocre videos, but they also have a fairly huge following. It’s about consistency. It’s about telling a story that people are interested in following. Just produce.

Q3: What do you wish you would’ve known when you first started?

A following is built on the back of consistency. Of time. You don’t need to produce the best videos out there, but you need dedication. Building a successful YouTube channel takes a lot of time. Lots of videos. Lots of uploads. And most importantly, an adherence to your own personal style.

Once people start to follow your style, keep at it. Your style WILL draw in a progressively larger audience over time.

Q4: What would you say to someone who’s nervous about being on camera?

Practice. The first time you sat behind the wheel of a car, you were probably nervous too. Now, you hop in the car and drive 80 MPH on a 4-lane highway without a second thought. Why? Because you do it so much. You’ve had practice. The more you produce, the more comfortable you’ll be.

Video from Courtney and Steve

Jessica jessicamoorhouse.com

Q1: How long have you been putting videos on YouTube? 

About one year, I started last September.

Q2: What 3 tips would you give to someone just starting on YouTube?

1. Well, if you’re going to do it. Do it right. That’s my first tip. And what I mean by that is get the right equipment. Luckily the latest iPhone is actually quite good in terms of video, so that might be just what you need. But, don’t cheap out on audio or lighting.

Get some softbox lights on Amazon, get a lavalier mic or boom mic so the audio is crisp and easy to hear. People notice these things, and the big YouTubers out there are making videos that are almost professional quality. They’ve set the standard, so make sure to try to emulate what they’re doing.

2. But, it’s not all about what it looks like. If your content is thin, if you’re obviously nervous, or if your videos don’t have a point, then no one will watch, comment or subscribe. Before each video, write a script (even if just bullet points) and have a clear idea of the video’s purpose.

3. Patience and consistency are key. Just like blogging, you need to put out videos regularly and be patient because chances are you won’t be an overnight sensation. I’m on my way to hitting 1,000 subscribers, and it’s taken me over a year to get there.

But, it’s all worth it because being on YouTube is exposing me to a new audience. An audience who will eventually sign on to my email list, get into my Facebook group, listen to my podcast and buy my products or hire me for my services.

It’s a long-game, you just need to remember that.

Q3: What do you wish you would’ve known when you first started?

How much time it takes, especially if you do it all yourself. I do it all. Set up, film, edit, and publish/promote. It’s not easy putting out a quality video each week, but if you want to do it, you really need to film a number of videos in advance so you can be a few months ahead of yourself. That’s still something I’m working at.

Q4: What would you say to someone who’s nervous about being on camera?

Just do it!

I’m a huge introvert, but I never wanted it to stop me from going places and doing big things. So, I just challenged myself to do something that scared me. That’s how I started doing my podcast, then public speaking, then being in front of the camera. The more I did it, the less scared I was and the better I got. Practice is key, and the sooner you start, the sooner you’ll think “Hey, I actually like being on camera!”

Video from Jessica

Want More Video?

If you’re interested in seeing who else is doing personal finance video, be sure to check out our list of top-ranked personal finance YouTubers!

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nick True

Nick True